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ok before you combat me with "NOOOO WHY DID YOU DO THAT?", I haven't actually got an anemone in my new tank, I just wanted to know why does your tank have to be established?

I've read a lot of conflicting information, so I thought if you guys just gave me one strong answer, that'd end it all :)

1. one source I read said to add an anemone into a newly setup tank before all other fish. I don't know why but ok...

2. a majority of people say not to add one until your tank is established (what exactly does this mean?/strong water parameters? I hae no idea)

3. last question, can you keep a clownfish without an anemone? I've read pieces that said it deprives them of natural habitat + the benefirs of the relationship between them? Others say they'll host in other corals (what other corals? /does that irritate the other corals?) or that they'll be just as happy without one?

just as a last note - I'm not looking to get an anemone, I just wanted to find out more about them :) just learning, that's all
 

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Im not so sure about the established tank for an anenome but a clown will be perfectly fine without one. Some will host other corals such as a frogspawn and as far as irritating the other corals that is different in every case. But my main answer is that a clown will do just fine without an anenome.
 

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ok before you combat me with "NOOOO WHY DID YOU DO THAT?", I haven't actually got an anemone in my new tank, I just wanted to know why does your tank have to be established?

I've read a lot of conflicting information, so I thought if you guys just gave me one strong answer, that'd end it all :)

1. one source I read said to add an anemone into a newly setup tank before all other fish. I don't know why but ok...

BS, anemones are delicate organisms that require stable water parameters, as a rule they require water that is ow in nitrates and phosphates and appropriate lighting for their particular species. new tank's that have not reached a semblence of biological equilibrium don't provide optimum conditions, but time a tank is established , alone will not guarentee sucess. It varies with the species.

2. a majority of people say not to add one until your tank is established (what exactly does this mean?/strong water parameters? I hae no idea)

See above, if you are even remotely considering an anemome, especially to host clowns i suggest you get Joyce Eilkersons book "Clownfish and Anemones"

3. last question, can you keep a clownfish without an anemone? I've read pieces that said it deprives them of natural habitat + the benefirs of the relationship between them? Others say they'll host in other corals (what other corals? /does that irritate the other corals?) or that they'll be just as happy without one?

Yes most clowns will be fine without a host anemone, tho certain species are more apt to breed when paired up with a suitable host. Then again they may do it the breeding thing with a clay flower pot or section of 3-4" PVC pipe, They don't read the manuals. Some will ost with anything from a power head to LPS corals,leathers or mushrooms, again they don't read the book. A common complaint about tank raised clowns is they are less apt to pair up and host anemones than wild caught, again fish are instinct driven but like people the drive toward certain behaviors varies among individual fish

just as a last note - I'm not looking to get an anemone, I just wanted to find out more about them :) just learning, that's all
better to ask question before making a compulsive purchase. If I had a dollar for everyone over the years that tried to pair clowns with a Condilactus or carpet that ended badly :(
Specific clown species normally host specific anemones. and while some are flexible, the golden rule in reefing is the more the fish and anemone cost the more finicky they will be, FWIW
 

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The camaro loving reefer
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i have a clown with out a nem,
you can try a frog spawn, or hammer coral, i have seen them on elegance corals.
you could also have a domino damsel host a nem.
 

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The Bitter Mod
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A mature tank is probably a better term than established. Basically we as hobbyists only think of the "cycle" as being a 3 part process, when in reality it's at least twice that. Basically after the initial 3 part process our tanks go through blooms and die offs of microscopic flaura and fauna until an equilibrium is reached which can take a year or more. Some of Anemones, Tridacna etc don't do well in tanks that are still going through the maturation process. Skeety did some research on this a few years ago and started a very informative thread. Sadly I can't find it and don't really feel like looking through his 10,000 posts.
 

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The anemone prefers a stable environment. The stability comes from a mature tank, along with a mature reefer that provides sound husbandry. Simple.

Anemones can live with out clowns and vice versa.

Here are a couple links that may interest you:

http://www.wetwebmedia.com/marine/inverts/cnidaria/anthozoa/bubbletipanemones.htm

http://www.karensroseanemones.net/

http://freshmarine.com/anemones.html

http://www.fishlore.com/clownfishanemonechart.htm

http://saltaquarium.about.com/od/anemoneclownfishprofiles/tp/tpclownanemonematches.htm

+1 on keeping a clown with coral as previously mentioned. There is no gaurantee your clown will host with your anemone or anything else for that matter. This will allow your tank to mature and you become familiar with keeping water parameters stable till it is time for the anemone. Most will say the tank should be at least 6 to 12 months old before adding an anemone.
I too would question your source that wants to add an anemone to a new tank.



 

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The only reason I can see for adding the anemone before anything else is so that it could find a spot where it is happy and not move. This way, it won't kill everything else in its path should it be added later and have to find a spot.
For the record, this may save you money initially, but it ignores everything else an anemone typically requires...stability in the ecosystem. Nem's are sensitive to changes and most hobbyists go through the most changes in the first year of a tank, meaning the worst environment for a nem to try and live in. Therefore, chances are said Nem will not survive and may take out everything in the tank anyway via a crash. Your ill fated attempt to save money by being lazy just cost you everything in your tank and you are now frustrated, quitting the hobby....

Better to be patient, add the easy stuff first, get to an stable environment, then worry about adding a nem...When/if that time comes, there are tricks to doing it with the least disruption/loss to other inhabitants. Let us know when you are ready.
 

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Or, better yet, if unsure, ask the experts on here (meaning not me) and they can let you know when you are ready.
 

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The camaro loving reefer
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like everyone says its totally not recomended. now im not a expert or have i had a reef tank for long but i have had 3 different anemones survive through my whole cycle process.(yes i know im an idiot!) one was a bta anotha a condilactus i dont remember the other off hand.
 

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Yeah but theres a difference between surviving and thriving, you were fortunate that they survived but you also don't really know what stress the nem went through. We all make mistakes in this hobby (I made enough that if I wrote them all down it would be about 2 or 3 phone books thick) the only thing I can say is ask before you do things. There is somebody on here that has made every mistake you can think of. Wish I would have done that, then my wallet would be alot heavier than it is.
 

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Doc Holiday
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Three years after the tank was set up I just now added my anemone..my clowns that I had since the beginning were fine with out it.
 

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Just know that I'm not sharing all mine!
 

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Reefer Madness
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All tanks go through a maturation process and anemones are especially sensitive to changes in water quality. I waited a year and was rewarded with a thriving animal and a happy clown (this picture shows one of my happy Sexy Shrimp).
 

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