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ReefDreams
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397 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
my 37 gallon reef tank is growing alot of red slime at the bottom of the tank all over the rocks ive never had this problem in 4 years i bought redsmile remover and did a 10 persent water change after 3 days and it came back full force any one know the reason why and what can i do or use to stop this before it covers every thing???:confused:
 

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Registered
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7,425 Posts
I had that and what I did to rid my tank of it was
1. Buy and ro/di unit
2. Changing my water 2x a month instead of 1x
3. Feed less often
4. Bought a better skimmer
5. Incressed the flow in my tank
6. made sure I changed my light bulbs every yr
Hope that helps
 

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c.a.g. owner and operator
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2,311 Posts
is this a sandbed tank and the sandbed is also 4 years old?
 

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ReefDreams
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397 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
yep

well my lights are new i have a pretty good skimmer and i do change my water 2wice a month my nefu works at the lfs and i get my water for free :) yep i have a big sand bed and i resently moved to my new home when i set up the tank i added a bag to it and when i moved i feed my three fish in thir twice a week i had a few more fish but they dident make the move :bawling: any way i wont to slove this problem be for i buy any fish for the tank in thir write now is a golden maroon a blue spot goby and a blenny witch none ofem swimm around the tank inless i feed them ! my waters allways good i have red sea test kits i check and the lfs checks my water every two weeks or so ....that red sea slime stuff made my skimmer pull out alot of water when i turned it on after 2 days with the powder in the water i duno what to do >>??
 

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Quo vadis, Domini.
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469 Posts
I had a 20 high reef that literally exploded with red slime when switched from 80 watts of NO to 130 watts of PC. I'm not saying that's what did it but nothing else had changed (DSB tank).

It went away (after trying all the chemical fixes) by adding a skimmer, a cleanup crew and cutting the light cycle down to less than 8 hours (actinic and daylight combined).
 

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ReefDreams
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397 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
what alce shold i try with cimicles use is thir some thing that i will not turn off tne skimmer with
 

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spsaddict
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941 Posts
20% weekley water change siphon out as much as u can each time and use rodi for topoff water if i am not mistaken i heard red slime remover can kill alot of benifitial bacteria and can probably cause a bacterial bloom
 

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34,435 Posts
your sandbed is full, time to replace it. once the sandbed has absorbed all of the phosphates it can then the cyano has free access to it from the water column. there is no way to remove it from the sandbed. it just needs to be replaced. there is some hope for the LR, but it will take a while.

raise it up off the sand so that it does not touch it. this will allow water to flow all around it and it will also allow the bacteria inside the rock to purge the rock of the phosphates through bacterial turgor. you will need to start siphoning out all detritus when you do water changes so that the new sandbed does not build up phosphates again so quickly.

lighting is irrelevant. you need phosphates to have cyano/HA.

G~
 

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Premium Member
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17,355 Posts
Change the sandbed, it's saturated now with phsphate, and as new phosphte comes into the system via feedings, specimen loss, coral mucus, etc., it is either free for assimilation by algae (or cyanobacteria) or causes a release/adsorption reaction equilibrium at the sand (or the surface of the rock, or the intestitial space of the rock): either way, it is now a problem each time you import phosphate sources into the tank. Replace all your old sand with fresh clean argonite sand. You may want to place a quart or so of your old sand in a containter for a month and keep it in the tank in an out-of-the-way corner, but remove it in another month to get as much of the trapped phosphates on the sand out of the tank. This will allow the organisms in the old sand an opportunity to migrate into your new sand bed, yet still give you a means of removing the phosphate that the old sand contains without leeching to much of it into the new sand.

THIS is what will stop your cyanobacteria problem. The use of macrolide antibiotics will kill the cyano up to a point, but does not get rid of the nutrient overload problem that precipitated the bloom to start with. Removing the pool of phosphate contained in the nutrient sink formed by the sand bed over time will allow the new sand to help control phosphate issues as your old sand did when it was relatively clean of phosphate adsorption. Your corals you'll find will also develop better colortion and their growth will be more pronounced as the free phosphte becomes trapped on the surfaces of your sand granules and in benthic algae rather that being free to affect algal growth and to fertilize zooxanthellae.

Be persistent, and export cyanobacterial biomass (and the phosphate it contains) at every end of the photoperiod to help reduce the overal concentration of phosphate in your system, you should begin to see results within the week.


HTH

Do not be tempted to reuse your sand, unless you want to use it for traction when the ice storms hit this winter...

;)


HTH
 

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ReefDreams
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397 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
thanks for this info ! i would of never thougt the sand would be the problem ! but u explained it pretty well and i do understand ....thanks for the info will post picz when iam finished
 
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