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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello, I'm Chris, I'm fairly new to Saltwater in the sense I've never had one of my own, But I do work at a Petco and occasionally help out a customer with Saltwater questions and needs,I reference books to answer there questions,

Anyway I am in the process of setting up my first tank, its a 55 gallon it was a kit that came with a filter, Heater, Hood and lights. I'm on a little bit of a budget for the time being, so I'm piecing it together 1 part at a time. As always im looking into the future for what i am going to want. Now tax times coming and I'm able to buy the rest of the components needed.

So sorry for the long intro there, my question being I'm looking to buy around a total of 70 - 75 pounds of live rock. I understand it is ok to cure LR through a new tank cycle, I'm just wondering if it is ok to add lets say 10 pounds per week or if that would kill off the growth from the previous weeks add? and in turn cause unruley problems. Btw I am not planning on adding any fish until I have all the LR i planned on getting and the tank is stable, In case anyone was worried.

P.S I'm sorry if this question has been answered elsewhere in the forum, I really wasn't sure how to word it in a search engine.
 

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Hi Chris Welcome to TRT, as to your live rock question I would try to accumulate it all maybe 50 lbs worth and go through the cooking process before "going live' with the tank( see sticky at top"notes on cooking live rock"
i would definately plan for an RO/DI filter before getting to deep into the hobby.
Tap and well water has a lot of stuff in it that is detrimental to a reef tank, even using tap water to make up SW mix for the initial setup will allow a lot of that stuff to bind up in the rock and cause you grief over time.
basic tools I would consider essential for setting up a reef tank are an RO/DI, refractometer, pH meter and good tst kits for amm.nitrite/nitrate/calcium/alk to start
Swing arm hydrometers are notoriously innacurate and dye test pH kits are not accurate either. Since Specific Gravity and pH will affect your calc/alk readings you want to start out with solid numbers. The Ammonia/nitrate should be good kits, test strips are a bit vague. HTH
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thank you Doug for your quick reply, I will look at that topic as soon as im done writing this reply. and all of them tools are on the list. The RO/DI may be a little tricky as I live in an apartment, so I'll have to talk my landlord about installing one though it should be an easy sell since its beneficial to the water quality for everyone. So worse case scenario if its a no go on the filter are there any good chems I could treat new water with?
 

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You can find one that will hook up to a facet, in your kitchen. The ones that run a household are off chart expensive, and he probably won't go for it. You can find them pretty reasonable online.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
ok thank you I was getting a little freaked out with the first few results on google. are there any specific features on them that are a must? Because I know they are going to differ from one another
 

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No offense but your a little hard to follow... I'll try and help you out the best i can. what size tank? how long has it been running? whats all in there? what are all your levels at on the tests?
 

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:lol: this is great!

first off, cbatka WELCOME TO TRT!!!!!!!!!!! :)

now howsboutafiver, don't listen to that guy anymore...

what you have are Aiptasia anemones (I assume), a peppermint shrimp CAN eat them, but it has to be the right one, there are two kinds that I have seen sold as peppermints http://www.reefcorner.com/SpecimenSheets/peppermint_shrimp.htm (the other is the camel back)

a pistol shrimp and goby are great, but will do nothing for the anemones as far as I know. now on the the lemon juice, you get a hypodermic needle, fill the syringe with lemon juice, and inject a little juice into the anemone... but that will not work for those Majano Anemones, if thats also what you have...


now back too cbatka,

I would buy all dry rock, its a lot cheaper, will not foul your tank cycle, and will look like the rest of the live rock in a few months, also there is no risk of adding pests with the dry stuff, just get a single small live rock that has nice color (coraline) and other critters you do want, and throw that in your tank.
 

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Aquatic Philosopher
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+1 Doug and +1 Nate_Bro


I like base rock too, works well with a lot less other issues
 

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fiver, I do not know where to begin...

1) Do not shop with "bills"... rather pick up what is "needed" and to do that, you need to research. Don't buy what you don't know. If you go into a LFS asking what youwant to be sold, they well sell it.

2) Don't buy a filefish, they get large. Peppermint shrimp are the best bet, cheap (about $5-$10 each), but you have to make sure your waterquality is good before hand. Shrimp molt if they are introduced into a new tank with a different salinity.

3)Most stuff sold in bottles is snakeoil. Only dechlorinator/detox like SeaChem's Prime is worth it. DO not buy bottle products unless you know what you are doing.
 

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Really?

<img src="http://www.thereeftank.com/gallery/files/2/7/2/8/8/was_the_ducks.jpg" alt="Was The Ducks" />

<img src="http://www.thereeftank.com/gallery/files/2/7/2/8/8/ducks_2.jpg" alt="Ducks 2" />
 
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