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Old 01-22-2014, 08:23 AM   #1
bio cube amature
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yellow clown goby hiding


Hi guys, my clown goby is hiding and not eating. I've had him for two days. its a 4 gallon pico reef. and no ich
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Old 01-22-2014, 08:40 AM   #2
ynot65
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What are you trying to feed it ?
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Old 01-22-2014, 08:42 AM   #3
bio cube amature
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Originally Posted by ynot65 View Post
What are you trying to feed it ?
Brine shrimp
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Old 01-22-2014, 08:42 AM   #4
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Originally Posted by ynot65 View Post
What are you trying to feed it ?
No. I meant mysis
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Old 01-22-2014, 08:43 AM   #5
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This guide is curttosey of The Cultured Reef, Many reefers have the same or similar situations. So this is directed at anyone interested in more success at keeping reef fish.

Newly acquired fish often refuse to eat for many reasons beginning with no one feeding them along their travel path from the Third World village fishers to your aquarium. Here are a few...

1. From the time they are caught they are not fed, many until you acquire them from your LFS. Some LFSs don't feed or feed very sparingly and some only get flake food because it's cheap and easy. This is a major source of stress. NOT a good thing!

2. All livestock, marine and freshwater, are bagged, transported, and dumped into water very different from that which they are accustomed to in the wild. And this happens multiple times along their journey, adding more stress.

3. At each stop, collector, holding facility, exporter, airline company, and importer, no one will care for these critters like you, the end buyer. You are at the highest price point along this route and you will ultimately, hopefully, keep the critter the longest. You have the most interest in doing so. All the previous handlers just want to push it along the trail to you.

Your challenge begins when you make the decision to take a fish home from the LFS. You know very little about it's origin and the rigors it went through. And, because marine fish are very likely to show their brilliant colors, until it's too late, defying most hobbyist's ability to recognize an ill fated purchase.

In the 47 years I've been heavily involved in the SW industry, there have been countless times I witnessed a LFS employee (even owners, most of whom I knew) sell a customer obvious (to me) fish that were doomed to die. Several times it made me so angry I spoke up to the customer (privately) and squashed the sale. I got caught several times and was banned from entering that establishment. To many LFSs, it's all about moving the product out the door. So what can you do? Educate yourself! Here are some things you can do...

First, every time you are about to lay out the cash, ASK the employee to feed the fish. Any excuse used to not feed them should MAKE you run out of that LFS and possibly never to return.

Second, it's your responsibility to educate yourself as to not only the needs of the fish you buy but also what certain diseases look like. It requires you to look beyond the outward beauty and SEE the stress induced disease inflicting the fish. It could be something as obvious as Ich, Brookinela (sp?)which, in it's early stage, is not so easy to detect. Here's a clue, a fish breathing rapidly likely has a parasite imbedded in it's gills robbing the fish of precious life supporting oxygen. Most likely Brookinela. Learn to look them over CLOSELY. Refuse to buy any suspected fish AND any in that tank or the entire system if it's all connected.

Third, Quarantine!!! Every purchase you make should be quarantined for a minimum of 30 days, longer if symptoms appear. A healthy looking fish could be on the brink of breaking out with something. If you don't quarantine, you risk contaminating your DT (display tank). If that happens you've got a major headache on your hands which could end up costing you more than a simple quarantine system. Quarantine!!!

Fourth, Feed whatever it takes to get them eating. Ninety-eight percent of EVERYTHING we offer them is FOREIGN to their taste buds. Be prepared to offer "whatever it takes" to get them to eat. When you find something they will eat feed them until they are full several times a day. Then expand the menu.

One final note. Many of you have been to my facility. Some of you have made comments like, I've never seen such fat fish. That's because I feed them until full several times a day. I can do that because I'm here. You can do it too, you just need to make it happen.

This post just scratches the surface of the problem. My hope is that it gets you thinking and researching the idiosyncrasies of this hobby. If you do, you will be come more successful in reefing and become a responsible reefer. In the long run, you'll save money.

Happy reefing

Dick
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Last edited by ynot65; 01-22-2014 at 08:51 AM.. Reason: Referencing the writer
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Old 01-22-2014, 08:48 AM   #6
bio cube amature
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ynot65 View Post
Coralreefer, this is not directed at you. Many reefers have the same or similar situations. So this is directed at anyone interested in more success at keeping reef fish.

Newly acquired fish often refuse to eat for many reasons beginning with no one feeding them along their travel path from the Third World village fishers to your aquarium. Here are a few...

1. From the time they are caught they are not fed, many until you acquire them from your LFS. Some LFSs don't feed or feed very sparingly and some only get flake food because it's cheap and easy. This is a major source of stress. NOT a good thing!

2. All livestock, marine and freshwater, are bagged, transported, and dumped into water very different from that which they are accustomed to in the wild. And this happens multiple times along their journey, adding more stress.

3. At each stop, collector, holding facility, exporter, airline company, and importer, no one will care for these critters like you, the end buyer. You are at the highest price point along this route and you will ultimately, hopefully, keep the critter the longest. You have the most interest in doing so. All the previous handlers just want to push it along the trail to you.

Your challenge begins when you make the decision to take a fish home from the LFS. You know very little about it's origin and the rigors it went through. And, because marine fish are very likely to show their brilliant colors, until it's too late, defying most hobbyist's ability to recognize an ill fated purchase.

In the 47 years I've been heavily involved in the SW industry, there have been countless times I witnessed a LFS employee (even owners, most of whom I knew) sell a customer obvious (to me) fish that were doomed to die. Several times it made me so angry I spoke up to the customer (privately) and squashed the sale. I got caught several times and was banned from entering that establishment. To many LFSs, it's all about moving the product out the door. So what can you do? Educate yourself! Here are some things you can do...

First, every time you are about to lay out the cash, ASK the employee to feed the fish. Any excuse used to not feed them should MAKE you run out of that LFS and possibly never to return.

Second, it's your responsibility to educate yourself as to not only the needs of the fish you buy but also what certain diseases look like. It requires you to look beyond the outward beauty and SEE the stress induced disease inflicting the fish. It could be something as obvious as Ich, Brookinela (sp?)which, in it's early stage, is not so easy to detect. Here's a clue, a fish breathing rapidly likely has a parasite imbedded in it's gills robbing the fish of precious life supporting oxygen. Most likely Brookinela. Learn to look them over CLOSELY. Refuse to buy any suspected fish AND any in that tank or the entire system if it's all connected.

Third, Quarantine!!! Every purchase you make should be quarantined for a minimum of 30 days, longer if symptoms appear. A healthy looking fish could be on the brink of breaking out with something. If you don't quarantine, you risk contaminating your DT (display tank). If that happens you've got a major headache on your hands which could end up costing you more than a simple quarantine system. Quarantine!!!

Fourth, Feed whatever it takes to get them eating. Ninety-eight percent of EVERYTHING we offer them is FOREIGN to their taste buds. Be prepared to offer "whatever it takes" to get them to eat. When you find something they will eat feed them until they are full several times a day. Then expand the menu.

One final note. Many of you have been to my facility. Some of you have made comments like, I've never seen such fat fish. That's because I feed them until full several times a day. I can do that because I'm here. You can do it too, you just need to make it happen.

This post just scratches the surface of the problem. My hope is that it gets you thinking and researching the idiosyncrasies of this hobby. If you do, you will be come more successful in reefing and become a responsible reefer. In the long run, you'll save money.

Happy reefing

Dick
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Old 01-22-2014, 08:49 AM   #7
bio cube amature
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ynot65 View Post
Coralreefer, this is not directed at you. Many reefers have the same or similar situations. So this is directed at anyone interested in more success at keeping reef fish.

Newly acquired fish often refuse to eat for many reasons beginning with no one feeding them along their travel path from the Third World village fishers to your aquarium. Here are a few...

1. From the time they are caught they are not fed, many until you acquire them from your LFS. Some LFSs don't feed or feed very sparingly and some only get flake food because it's cheap and easy. This is a major source of stress. NOT a good thing!

2. All livestock, marine and freshwater, are bagged, transported, and dumped into water very different from that which they are accustomed to in the wild. And this happens multiple times along their journey, adding more stress.

3. At each stop, collector, holding facility, exporter, airline company, and importer, no one will care for these critters like you, the end buyer. You are at the highest price point along this route and you will ultimately, hopefully, keep the critter the longest. You have the most interest in doing so. All the previous handlers just want to push it along the trail to you.

Your challenge begins when you make the decision to take a fish home from the LFS. You know very little about it's origin and the rigors it went through. And, because marine fish are very likely to show their brilliant colors, until it's too late, defying most hobbyist's ability to recognize an ill fated purchase.

In the 47 years I've been heavily involved in the SW industry, there have been countless times I witnessed a LFS employee (even owners, most of whom I knew) sell a customer obvious (to me) fish that were doomed to die. Several times it made me so angry I spoke up to the customer (privately) and squashed the sale. I got caught several times and was banned from entering that establishment. To many LFSs, it's all about moving the product out the door. So what can you do? Educate yourself! Here are some things you can do...

First, every time you are about to lay out the cash, ASK the employee to feed the fish. Any excuse used to not feed them should MAKE you run out of that LFS and possibly never to return.

Second, it's your responsibility to educate yourself as to not only the needs of the fish you buy but also what certain diseases look like. It requires you to look beyond the outward beauty and SEE the stress induced disease inflicting the fish. It could be something as obvious as Ich, Brookinela (sp?)which, in it's early stage, is not so easy to detect. Here's a clue, a fish breathing rapidly likely has a parasite imbedded in it's gills robbing the fish of precious life supporting oxygen. Most likely Brookinela. Learn to look them over CLOSELY. Refuse to buy any suspected fish AND any in that tank or the entire system if it's all connected.

Third, Quarantine!!! Every purchase you make should be quarantined for a minimum of 30 days, longer if symptoms appear. A healthy looking fish could be on the brink of breaking out with something. If you don't quarantine, you risk contaminating your DT (display tank). If that happens you've got a major headache on your hands which could end up costing you more than a simple quarantine system. Quarantine!!!

Fourth, Feed whatever it takes to get them eating. Ninety-eight percent of EVERYTHING we offer them is FOREIGN to their taste buds. Be prepared to offer "whatever it takes" to get them to eat. When you find something they will eat feed them until they are full several times a day. Then expand the menu.

One final note. Many of you have been to my facility. Some of you have made comments like, I've never seen such fat fish. That's because I feed them until full several times a day. I can do that because I'm here. You can do it too, you just need to make it happen.

This post just scratches the surface of the problem. My hope is that it gets you thinking and researching the idiosyncrasies of this hobby. If you do, you will be come more successful in reefing and become a responsible reefer. In the long run, you'll save money.

Happy reefing

Dick
so what do I do
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Old 01-22-2014, 09:04 AM   #8
ynot65
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Try adding some garlic to the shrimp, Garlic Guard or a similar product. If that dosent help downsize to brine shrimp
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Old 01-22-2014, 05:01 PM   #9
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I have had good success with Clown Gobies and have had great success with them eating Nutrimar OVA. They are prawn eggs. Its very small in size. In my past experiences, Clown Gobies are much more willing to try food that fits in their tiny mouths.
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Old 01-22-2014, 06:27 PM   #10
raRE EFfects
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he's probably just not used to the system yet, and needs time to adjust to it. Try feeding him small foods that he can fit into his mouth such as brine shrimp
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