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Old 11-30-2011, 08:05 PM   #16
chstewart
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Originally Posted by Elegance Coral View Post
Get the in line TDS meter. This is the one I've always used. http://www.bulkreefsupply.com/store/...m-digital.html
I guess it is a matter of opinion of which one to buy I was just told in another thread not to get that one. http://www.thereeftank.com/forums/f6/ro-or-rodi-177124.html
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Old 11-30-2011, 08:11 PM   #17
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Its always just a matter of opinion.... I prefer the inline units myself...
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Old 11-30-2011, 08:32 PM   #18
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Inline TDS meters are not temperature compensated and are not as accurate as handhelds. They are also limited to two points so lack portability, not nearly as useful as a a handheld. A $12 TDS meter will be just that, you get what you pay for with anything RO/DI related. The least expensive TDS meter worth owning is the handheld TDS meter from www.buckeyefieldsupply.com at around $20.
I own two dual inlines and two handhelds, I never even turn the inlines on anymore and only use my COM-100 handheld since its is both accurate and repeatable, the inlines are NEVER correct and my water and air temperatures are pretty close here in Phoenix. Don't waste your money.

Saltwater test kits DO NOT work with ultrapure water.
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Old 11-30-2011, 09:32 PM   #19
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Did you test the water straight out of the RODI, or out of a storage container? What are you storing the water in? Brute's have been known to leach some phosphate back into RODI...
This one you're gonna have to explain to me

How does phosphate leach from plastic into plain ole' water. What is in the water that could pull phosphate from plastic. I guess the only real way to know is to replace the filters on the RODI and test the water for phosphates. Then store the water in the container for a while and retest it to see if there is a change.

(my bet is that he phosphate he found in the water came into the container with the water.)
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Old 11-30-2011, 09:39 PM   #20
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Plasticizers used in the making of plastics contain phophate laden compounds. These plasticizers can and will leach back into anything in the containers. While these compounds may not be harmful to use and deemed food safe, they can add things back into the RODI and such that is stored in them.

Ultrapure water like RODI does not like being in that state of neutrality and will try to teeter one direction or the other by pulling in any compound or mineral they come in contact with. RODI is also labeled as being semi-corrosive due to these characteristics... Ive heard this referred to as hungry water syndrome...
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Old 11-30-2011, 09:47 PM   #21
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RO/DI is very agressive, it has been stripped of all its contaminants (ions) and is trying to get back to its natural "dirty" state. It will pull things out of the air, dust, containers or anything it comes into contact with.

Plastics can contain many substances in their make up as well as mould release agents and oils, some of which can be transferred to the water or even surrounding air like volatile and aromatics.

If you have ever looked at an inline TDS meter probe, you will see there is a small rectangular opening or window in the fatter part of the probe. If you cut the probe apart ( I have seen them cut apart) it houses the metal temperature probe, which is exposed to atmosphere not water so is not sensing the true water temperature which is rarely the same and leads to inaccuracy or erronious readings.
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Old 11-30-2011, 09:55 PM   #22
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Plasticizers used in the making of plastics contain phophate laden compounds. These plasticizers can and will leach back into anything in the containers. While these compounds may not be harmful to use and deemed food safe, they can add things back into the RODI and such that is stored in them.
Huh! I didn't know that! So what is in the water that attracts the phosphate from the plasticizers? The phosphate would be in a chemical compound with the minerals in the plasticizers right? it would take a stronger pull from another mineral or compound to seperate them wouldn't it?

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Ultrapure water like RODI does not like being in that state of neutrality and will try to teeter one direction or the other by pulling in any compound or mineral they come in contact with. RODI is also labeled as being semi-corrosive due to these characteristics... Ive heard this referred to as hungry water syndrome...
Googled it. the only thing I found was a 3-4 sentance piece in a "the reef tank" thread. Interesting though. I wonder if teeters the other way if it would become even more pure.
Semi corrosive???? What???? holy smokes!!! Maybe I should stop making my coffee with it
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Old 11-30-2011, 10:01 PM   #23
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Ultrapure water is not neutral, it has swung way to the other side and is agressive versus tap water that would tend to scale or build up. RO only is more neutral.
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Old 11-30-2011, 10:06 PM   #24
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When I say neutral, i mean in pH terms... as only truly pure water will have a pH of 7.... and it will generally shift to either the more acidic or more basic side of the scale, depending on what it takes in to get off the teeter..
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Old 11-30-2011, 10:06 PM   #25
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RO/DI is very agressive, it has been stripped of all its contaminants (ions) and is trying to get back to its natural "dirty" state. It will pull things out of the air, dust, containers or anything it comes into contact with.

Plastics can contain many substances in their make up as well as mould release agents and oils, some of which can be transferred to the water or even surrounding air like volatile and aromatics.
WOW! Very interesting!! In the grand scheme of things, on what type of scale are we talking about. Like ppm. Are we talking about a noticable, measurabe difference. Enough that it would affect a hobbiest reef?? or are we talking about this on a molecular level that wouldn't be measurabe with the standard hobbiest equipment.

And also, wouldn't we have to assume that based on this information, a typical plastic container would only get safer and safer over the course of time as more and more phosphate etc. is released into the water, thus not being left in the plastic anymore?
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Old 11-30-2011, 10:09 PM   #26
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When I say neutral, i mean in pH terms... as only truly pure water will have a pH of 7.... and it will generally shift to either the more acidic or more basic side of the scale, depending on what it takes in to get off the teeter..
I'm not understanding what you are saying here. I can take my tap water and add ph+ or ph- and make it 7. that's easy. And of course it would not be pure at all.
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Old 11-30-2011, 10:11 PM   #27
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We are talking at the hobbyist level, depending on how pure the source water is and how well the filtration unit is able to do its job. We like to refer to water purity in TDS in the hobby, while what we are truly looking for is is resistivity in megohms
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Old 11-30-2011, 10:13 PM   #28
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I'm not understanding what you are saying here. I can take my tap water and add ph+ or ph- and make it 7. that's easy. And of course it would not be pure at all.
You are having to add to it to make it 7, maning it is naturally not at that reading. Like I said, only naturally ultrapure water will have a pH of 7.0, adding things to it no longer makes it neutral, nor pure
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Old 11-30-2011, 10:15 PM   #29
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And also, wouldn't we have to assume that based on this information, a typical plastic container would only get safer and safer over the course of time as more and more phosphate etc. is released into the water, thus not being left in the plastic anymore?
Yes... but I have read of one guy that actually was testing for this using a Hanna meter over a period of years and it took a very long time (ie years) for all the stuff to leach out and get undetectable levels while testing...
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Old 11-30-2011, 10:18 PM   #30
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We are talking at the hobbyist level, depending on how pure the source water is and how well the filtration unit is able to do its job. We like to refer to water purity in TDS in the hobby, while what we are truly looking for is is resistivity in megohms
Ok, misunderstanding by me . I though you were saying that only pure water can have a ph of 7.
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