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Old 04-10-2007, 03:20 PM   #1
Orient Master
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LPS .vs SPS ?????


I'm very new to all this. But my question is what is the difference between LPS and SPS? I just found out that LPS stands for Large Polyp Stony, ans SPS stand for Small Polyp Stony. But what else is different . like lights, flow, feeding, compatability. I would like to get a larger reef tank setup soon and i am trying to learn as much as i can.

Also i have heard some people talk about fragging some of there items in there tanks twhen they to big. I have read that other people offer to pay for shipping for these frags. m ore about that????
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Old 04-10-2007, 03:48 PM   #2
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The difference between the two comes down to time, dedication and of course money. Soft corals and LPS are much easier to care for and propogate. SPS require more light, more flow...more everything...deffinately alot more attention and not to mention near perfect water parameters.
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Old 04-10-2007, 03:48 PM   #3
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heres a short answer il let others give you a long one

LPS good flow, good light, good quailty water

SPS high flow, high light, great water quailty
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Old 04-10-2007, 03:50 PM   #4
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LPS...OK for amateurs

SPS....For PROS only!!!!
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Old 04-10-2007, 04:04 PM   #5
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Coral, called "LPS" by hobbyists, include things like Torch, Hammer, Frogspawn, Fox. The assumption is that these coral prefer calmer conditions and lower light than "SPS" coral. Coral, called "SPS" by hobbyists, include things like Montis, Acros, Birds Nest, Pavonas, Pocilloporas. The assumption is that these coral prefer brisk flow and bright light.

The assumption isn't always valid. Some coral, labeled "LPS" like very bright light. Some coral, labeled "SPS" can tolerate lower light conditions. So, it's always a good idea to get a good book on coral, and research the specific needs of a coral you are interested in keeping before adding it to your tank.

"Fragging" refers to "fragmenting", or breaking apart, a large coral colony into smaller pieces. The survival rate of a frag may be higher than the survival rate of a colony recently imported from the wild, since the parent colony of the frag has already demonstrated the ability to do well in captivity. Getting frags from fellow hobbyists also reduces the need to import new colonies from the wild, reducing the impact our hobby has on coral reefs.
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Old 04-10-2007, 04:06 PM   #6
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Originally Posted by Weatherman View Post
Coral, called "LPS" by hobbyists, include things like Torch, Hammer, Frogspawn, Fox. The assumption is that these coral prefer calmer conditions and lower light than "SPS" coral. Coral, called "SPS" by hobbyists, include things like Montis, Acros, Birds Nest, Pavonas, Pocilloporas. The assumption is that these coral prefer brisk flow and bright light.

The assumption isn't always valid. Some coral, labeled "LPS" like very bright light. Some coral, labeled "SPS" can tolerate lower light conditions. So, it's always a good idea to get a good book on coral, and research the specific needs of a coral you are interested in keeping before adding it to your tank.

"Fragging" refers to "fragmenting", or breaking apart, a large coral colony into smaller pieces. The survival rate of a frag may be higher than the survival rate of a colony recently imported from the wild, since the parent colony of the frag has already demonstrated the ability to do well in captivity. Getting frags from fellow hobbyists also reduces the need to import new colonies from the wild, reducing the impact our hobby has on coral reefs.

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Old 04-10-2007, 04:11 PM   #7
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That's the VERY same thing I said...I used FAR FEWER words!
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Old 04-10-2007, 04:20 PM   #8
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Originally Posted by thekid55 View Post
heres a short answer il let others give you a long one

LPS good flow, good light, good quailty water

SPS high flow, high light, great water quailty
that's a pretty good analogy there
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Old 04-10-2007, 07:01 PM   #9
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In terms of taxonomy, there is almost no difference. Some folks actually pitch a stink when you use the terms because of this (I guess they don't appreciate the generalizations which make the hobby a little easier). But, thekid has put out some good words together.

I also find fragging a good means of stocking a tank, as it's typically cheaper if you have some good friends in the hobby. While I respect that it also helps reduce the taxing on natural reefs, it's a great way to save a few bucks (friends tend to sell cheap, or even given away).
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Old 04-10-2007, 07:12 PM   #10
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Acroporas are the BOMB!!!!
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