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Old 12-30-2008, 02:16 PM   #1
Aquaripure
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The Aquaripure and $$$


A person wrote,

"I was just commenting on the fact that for the type of money this system would cost I'd rather get another tank. It's just a budget factor. Water changes don't cost me money (I know, time is money ) and I'd enjoy having another tank. If I was rich I'd have a fish room and an entire Aquaripure network! ... "
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Old 12-30-2008, 02:18 PM   #2
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This was the response,

"I agree that for a small 10-15 gallon tank it's probably better just to do water changes. I do have a mini denitrator for tanks less than 20 gallons but I do not make it personally (it's made by "Posiedon") and they don't sell that well although every now and then someone wants one.

Some people might prefer just to do water changes and I can't argue that but I have a 29 gallon FW planted tank and a 180 gallon SW reef tank and I can prove it saves me a LOT of $$$.

My tap water is very hard and alkaline so I can't use it in my 29 gallon tank and I have to buy distilled water (that has pH of 7) for about $1 a gallon. On the SW tank I have to use salt which costs at least $0.35 a gallon and thats just using tap water. If I use R/O water the costs go up a lot more. And then it takes me at least 30 minutes a week for the FW tank if I did a water change every week and my SW tanks takes FOREVER (at least it seems like it) to change the water ... at least 2 hours total to mix drain and refill and get everything back where it was.

Soo ... If I did a 35% water change on both tanks every week it would take me 120+ hours per year. Even at minimum wage that would be at least worth $800+. My FW tank would cost me (29 x .35 x 52 x $1) = $528 in distilled water and my SW tank would cost (180 x .35 x 52 x $0.35) = $1147 in salt. So the total cost would be at least $2475 a year!

With my Aquaripure filters I do water change about every 3 months so that's a savings of well over $2150 for me.

I do realize that I own the company but if you think about it and do the math I think you will see that I am not exaggerating ... it really does save me a ton of time and $$$ : ) That's why I believe in it so much.

John Strawn
Aquaripure, LLC
www.aquaripure.com
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Old 12-30-2008, 03:46 PM   #3
OneDummHikk
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Ehh, is it not the trace elements you recommend adding that keep the water changes down on a reef tank and not the Aquaripure filter that does it? If so, then the filter itself isn't having an impact on water change regimen unless you are referring to lowering nitrates through water changes and won't live rock and a good skimmer do the same thing?
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Old 12-31-2008, 03:12 PM   #4
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In my experience and in the experience of many Aquaripure customers, the Aquaripure is superior in permanently removing nitrates to any live rock/ skimmer/ substrate combo.

The Aquaripure achieves this using anaerobic bacterial processes through which all organic matter entering the filter is completely broken down into their fundamental elements and gasses. See http://www.aquaripure.com/nitrates.htm for more on that process.

A skimmer just traps larger organic molecules for collection and removal. It does nothing to remove actual nitrates. A lot of rock and a deep sand bed and other methods can all remove some limited nitrates. In a lightly stocked tank you might be able to combine enough other methods to manage nitrates satisfactorily. However, a specialized nitrate filter like Aquaripure does this in an extremely effective and efficient manner. Most people have trouble getting the results that a specialized nitrate filter can provide, especially tanks with a larger bioload such as fish only tanks. Again, I do not count DIY coil nitrate filters in this category as they are usually ineffective.

There are other valid methods of keeping water quality high and I can not argue against any of them although every method has it's pros and cons. I compare many of them at http://www.aquaripure.com/Comparison.htm However, the Aquaripure is in my experience and opinion one of the easiest and most cost effective method to maintain high water quality without very frequent water changes.

If an Aquaripure is used and fewer water changes are performed then it is important to continue to monitor all trace elements, pH, phosphate levels, salinity, alkalinity, etc. But regular monitoring and supplement additions are more than enough to keep everything in check and it takes less time and is less expensive than a weekly water changes.

Again, it is perfectly ok if you’d prefer use other methods to maintain your aquarium. My only point is that the Aquaripure is also a perfectly viable option and many Aquaripure customers have found it to be the best option for them. I get new unsolicited e-mails every week thanking me for making my product and that’s what keeps me going.

John Strawn
Aquaripure, LLC
www.aquaripure.com

Last edited by Aquaripure; 12-31-2008 at 03:17 PM..
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Old 01-01-2009, 12:34 PM   #5
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For example, I just got this unsolicited e-mail ...

"I have been battling high nitrates in my saltwater (fish and a few corals) fishtank forever (80 gal). When I say high, I mean off the charts high. I tried everything to get my nitrates down and came across your website. I choked at the price when I saw it...but, with some (or a lot of) hesitation ordered the filter.

It took almost 3-4 months to get my nitrates down....but, they are now at a zero level! I am amazed at your product and would recommend it to everyone!!!

Thank you,
Deni"
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Old 01-01-2009, 01:37 PM   #6
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I don't doubt that you get a lot of emails saying thanks. I am more interested in how the product actually works so that I can decide whether its for me or not. And no, its not a loaded statement. The 120 I have I want set up with no live rock in the display at all. That leaves me with trying to find alternative methods of filtration. And when I ask about yours, you simply tell me how great it is and that raises a red flag to me. If the product can't be produced for less than what you produce it for, then it wouldn't make a lot of sense for me to try to build my own since it would cost more. Without the aspect of competition (which I wouldn't want to do anyway), I see no reason at all not to tell me, specifically, why its better than a simple setup using a coil denitrator, supplementing trace elements and dosing the tank with a sugar source.
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Old 01-01-2009, 08:19 PM   #7
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I have honestly tried to plainy state why the Aquaripure is better than a coil denitrator in these posts. The internal area available for bacteria to grow on is much, much greater than possible with any coil type design. It would take 400-500 ft or more of tubing to equal an Aquaripure. This would be bulky and expensive. Tubing varies greatly in quality and the cheap stuff at Home Depot is extremely low quality. It will harden and yellow and not last very long. I mean there would be a number of ways to replicate a good nitrate filter but most of them would wind up being bulky and/or costing about as much as just buying one, especially if you used quality materials. Also, most of the nitrate removing media sold doesn't come with any container and needs to be replaced. It would be counter productive for me to give step by step directions.

As far as supplementing with trace elements this should be done in any saltwater aquarium to some extent.

Dosing the Aquarium directly with sugar or ethanol is utilized by some to reduce nitrates and I have read reports of varying success but in my opinion it's a bit dangerous. If you aren't careful it can easily cause a bacterial bloom in the tank and kill everything. Even at low doses it is likely to kill snails and other inverts. I am not even certain that there is a good point at which it is safe to all tank inhabitants and effective at removing all nitrates. In any case the exact amount required is likely to change with other tank parameters and require a lot of trail and error. I have done some limited experimentation with direct dosing and found it to be of limited effectiveness and it killed all my snails more than once. In the Aquaripure the nutrient is confined to the filter itself and very little ever escapes. All I am saying is that the Aquaripure is safer and more effective than dosing the tank directly when used as directed.

I am proud of my product and I am an advocate of it, after all it is my company. I like to use testimonials simply to show that other customers like the product as well. I do respect other products and methods of aquarium maintenance and nitrate removal though. I do honestly feel that my product is a great nitrate filter and a good option for many people. It's not a "miracle" product by any means and I don't want people to think that. I just want it to be known as a really well designed, high quality, and effective nitrate filter.

John Strawn
Aquaripure, LLC
www.aquaripure.com

Last edited by Aquaripure; 01-01-2009 at 08:39 PM..
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Old 01-02-2009, 12:15 AM   #8
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Thank you.
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Old 01-02-2009, 07:19 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Aquaripure View Post

Dosing the Aquarium directly with sugar or ethanol is utilized by some to reduce nitrates and I have read reports of varying success but in my opinion it's a bit dangerous. If you aren't careful it can easily cause a bacterial bloom in the tank and kill everything. Even at low doses it is likely to kill snails and other inverts. I am not even certain that there is a good point at which it is safe to all tank inhabitants and effective at removing all nitrates. In any case the exact amount required is likely to change with other tank parameters and require a lot of trail and error. I have done some limited experimentation with direct dosing and found it to be of limited effectiveness and it killed all my snails more than once. In the Aquaripure the nutrient is confined to the filter itself and very little ever escapes. All I am saying is that the Aquaripure is safer and more effective than dosing the tank directly when used as directed.
Straight from the aquaripure site

Do I have to change anything or add anything to the Aquaripure?
Unlike other filters in which you have to replace the internal media, you will never have to change anything on the Aquaripure. There are no filters to change and no mess to deal with. There is a "feeding" tube on all of Aquaripure's denitrators that is very easy to use. You simply inject sugar water or alcohol into the denitrator once a week. Feeding and adjusting the Aquaripure only costs pennies and will only take seconds of your time. Aquaripure's denitrators are designed to be easy to setup and maintain, and will give you many years of service.


isnt the aquaripure simply a dosing system?
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Old 01-02-2009, 08:38 AM   #10
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No, not at all. What you inject is a very small amount of sucrose or ethanol solution. This creates a bacterial bloom in the filter itself and it is the bacteria within the filter that actually cleanses the water and breaks down all organic matter passing through it, even nitrates. Water needs to pass through the filter relatively slowly so the flow rate has to be adjusted every couple of days or so as well. The bacteria in the filter does create varying resistance and so the flow will fluctuate a bit. The nutrient is used by bacteria within the filter itself, very little will make it's way out of the tank.

Basically, you inject nutrient (ethanol or sucrose) every 4-7 days and you adjust the flow rate every 2-3 days and the bacteria does all the work. It takes only a few seconds to adjust it each time and is very straightforward.

John Strawn
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www.aquaripure.com
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