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Blue Linckia Sea Star

 
Dramatic blue accent color and sea star shape add DT interest.


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If you have a huge tank with plenty of live rock you might consider this featured

Comments This is such a tempting sea star for people. It's big, and blue, and interesting. However, it's likely to starve to death in most tanks. Their natural diet isn't really well known but it's believed to be mostly micro fauna, floating microbes, and bio film. Some have reported they eat sponges and tunicates as well.

In a very large tank (300 gallons) you would probably be able to keep one of these for years. In smaller tanks they seem to live for about a year, then die. At minimum I would say 150 gallons with plenty of live rock and then only if the tank has been established for at least a year.

Aside from the above food issues, there is also the fact that they get a food across to consider when keeping one. Even though they are reef-safe, something that large can really do a number on rocks and corals just by moving around the tank to get where it wants to go. Usually where it wants to go as a juvenile is hidden in the rocks, once larger it likes the sand or or especially the glass for foraging.

A careful, slow drip acclimation for a couple of hours is a must for this animal. They are very sensitive to changes in water chemistry so the initial acclimation is the most critical time and should not be rushed.

They get along with other sea stars and with fish.


Liked about it 1. Bright blue color.
2. Reef-safe.


Didn't like 1. Specialized diet.
2. Large size.


Overall rating:
 
2.5
Overall satisfaction:
 
4.0
Would consider buying it again:
 
1.0

By tcamos
Sep 27, 2010
 
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Difficult to acclimate but beautiful blue sea star

Comments The blue linckia sea star requires expertise because of its requirements: careful acclimation, stable parameters, no copper, no exposure to air, and diet of film algae (established tank only). Once you have it adjusted in your tank, the sea star will thrive and add accent beauty and color. Its natural habitat is solitary life on reef edges; it requires adequate lighting. Younger sea stars will hide and feed among rocks and crevices. Mature sea stars will also attach by several arms and let the remaining arms float to catch food from the water. Remove the parasitic snail (Thyca crystalline) if spotted on the sea star. Native to Fiji, sea stars in the wild have significant regenerative ability; captive sea stars have lost much of this regenerative ability. Never cut one apart expecting to end up with two sea stars.


Liked about it (1) Reef-safe and peaceful
(2) Beautiful color and sea star shape
(3) Helps control film algae


Didn't like (1) Difficult to acclimate, cannot be exposed to air, and sensitive to changes in parameters. (You might lose the sea star getting it established, but once you have a sea star adjusted to your tank it should thrive.)
(2) Requires a stable, mature tank to have film algae food source.
(3) Monitor for parasitic snail infestation.


Overall rating:
 
5.0
Overall satisfaction:
 
5.0
Would consider buying it again:
 
5.0

By Fielding12
Mar 28, 2010
 
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