Water Conservation
Why Should We Care About Water?
Written by Ava
  

Lloyd Carter certainly does. In fact, he's made caring about water and water laws part of his life's career.  Lloyd was a UPI and Fresno Bee reporter and has been writing about California water issues for more than 35 years.  That's not all he wrote about, of course, but for him, it was pretty obvious that he should make his new site all about water--because water is so important to everyday life and taking care of it is crucial.

Besides writing about water, Lloyd is also the President of the California Save Our Streams Council and a member of other organizations. He gets to mouth off about water every month on a radio show on KFCF, 88.1 FM in Fresno  

When it comes to water conservation, Lloyd Carter knows what he's talking about.  After all, he's heard about it and written about it for more than two decades!

His personal homepage, Chronicles of The Hydraulic Brotherhood, is dedicated to his thoughts, opinions, and ramblings on everything water and water law..   

Let's see what Lloyd has to say:

 
Sylvia Earle on Colbert
Written by Claire
  
It's been a bonanza for ocean conservationists on fake news shows recently - first Jon Stewart mocks Sean Hannity's ignorance of how ecosystems work, and now Stephen Colbert talks to Her Deepness about overfishing and ocean health.

Although her clip puts me in mind of something I've always wanted to see: accurate pricing of goods that are only cheap when you ignore the environmental harm they cause. Wouldn't it be nice to have two prices for a pound of fish - the actual price the consumer pays, and then the cost per pound when pollution from fishing vessels, bycatch and habitat damage are included? Not to mention government subsidies, or, if catch limits are above those recommended by scientists, how much the economy will lose if the fishery collapses. It won't change behavior overnight, but I'm convinced people will never understand the need to conserve unless they understand the value of what they lose when a product, service, or food source is obtained or made in an environmentally damaging way.

We need to stop thinking about environmental protection as a luxury good, only to be obtained when convenient. Environmental damage and overfishing involve real costs, both in the short-term and the long-term. We can no longer let those who incur these costs avoid paying for them. If you go to a gym, you're expected to pay for the privilege of using the equipment, which you don't
 
Water Conservation Tips
Written by Aqua Blog Maven
  

Aquafornia, the California Water News Blog by the Water Education Foundation is dedicated to providing comprehensive news and information about California water issues and issues that affect the Southwest by posting links from the news, press releases, trade magazines, and blogs. 

Unfortunately, it's not so difficult to find water issues that affect us everyday.  The blog posts are updated 7 days a week with breaking news whenever it occurs.  

The blog and the Water Education Foundation is dedicated to educating all of us about the water issues affecting California, and therefore, all of us all around the world.  They want to create a better understanding of general water issues and help resolve water resource problems through educational means and awareness.   They provide educational resources, recommended reading, data on the current California water crisis, research and more.

 
The Key To Making a Difference
Written by Ava
  

For David DiSalvo, the key to water conservation is making the right choices, but it's also about getting the word out. As an environmental public outreach specialist with smidgens of marketing and editing and loads of science writing under his belt, it's easy to see why he's the perfect man for the job, encouraging the world that even small contributions, like reusing towels at hotels, makes a difference. 

While he also writes about energy, public health, healthcare, social marketing, and air quality, we wanted to get his take on the subject of water conservation and cleaning wastewater, as he's worked to spread the message as a marketing specialist and written on the topic for places like his blog, Neuronarrative, which addresses public awareness topics and ideas that intersect with neuroscience and psychology.

Water conservation and clean water is on the way up and that’s due in part to the efforts of David DiSalvo.

 
Say Hello to SUSIE
Written by Ava
  

SUSIErockIf you love water as much as we do...and you have yet to hear all about the wonderful SUSIE program at Oregan State University...you don't know what you're missing!

Two months ago, we interviewed hydrogeologist and Professor of Geosciences Michael E. Campana and somehow we overlooked the amazing stuff his own students are doing! 

The Study of the U.S. Institute for the Environment (SUSIE) is a program for Central American and Caribbean undergraduates that emphasizes all things water, including watersheds, sanitation, citizen stewardship and infrastructure.  

SUSIE recently brought together 22 students from 8 countries to OSU to spend the entire season in mult-disciplinary environmental studies.  In an article by OSU's Powered by Orange, we learned that students like Johara Henriquez, a food technologist who wants to implement cleaner food production in the Dominican Republic, Political science major Jamille Chen from Jamaica, and Panama's Marianne Ricord studying biology and interested in working at the Smithsonian, would have never known about the great things they could be doing (and are doing as we speak) as well as getting their Master's at OSU, if it weren't for the SUSIE program.  The students range in age from 18 to 24 years old. 

 
Live Blue Initiative Asks For Pledges To Protect The Ocean
Written by Sarah van Schagen
  
Feeling blue about the fate of the ocean these days? Perhaps you're concerned about climate change, worried about whaling, or overwhelmed with overfishing.  

It's true the ocean is facing many threats – but as vast as that big blue expanse may seem, there's plenty you can do to help protect it. And you can start by “living blue.”

The New England Aquarium's Live Blue Initiative asks ocean lovers to make a pledge to live blue by making simple changes that can lead to healthier waters.  

Their website features a rotating globe that allows you to choose a particular “plot” to preserve with your pledge. It's Google Earth meets online petition.  
 
Q&A With Hari Srinivas
Written by Ava
  

We found Hari Srinivas in an effort to contact someone from the Global Development Research Center (GRDC) just in time for World Oceans Day on June 8.  The Center had already made every effort to promote ocean conservation and appeal to the United Nations in order to make World Oceans Day an official day of recognition.  See here.

We got one of the best people we could--Hari is The coordinator of the Center.

Little did we know that the GRDC was based in Japan, and when we found Hari Srinivas, he had just returned from Ethiopia to be thrust into all the chaos and conservation that went into promoting World Oceans Day.

Hari wasn't able to get to us in time for the big Ocean event, but he kindly answered our questions later and we had the opportunity to find out a great deal--from his opinion on current climate issues to the perspective of the GRDC to the marine situation in Japan!

 
The Water King
Written by Ava
  

He's a water king? He can do anything?

Ok, maybe there's no need for the Jim Morrison reference (Morrison referred to himself as The Lizard King instead). Michael Campana, after all, is no water king.  But he does like to refer to himself as an inveterate, unrepentant, water wonk.

You can also call him a hydrogeologist, Professor of Geosciences at Oregon State University, founder of the Ann Campana Judge Foundation, a water conservation projects developer,devout water protector, and about a million other names.

One thing's for sure--Michael Campana's no bore and neither are his uplifting water protection projects.  

Hear about them all, along with his plan to save the world--one water bucket at a time.

 


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